Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Health & Wellness Services Division of Student Affairs

Need help quitting tobacco?

students discuss quitting tobacco

If you’re thinking about quitting tobacco, now’s a great time to start! Starting this fall, WSU Pullman will become a tobacco-free campus.

Quitting is tough! But know that you are not alone. Health & Wellness Services has a variety of free resources to help WSU students nix nicotine. We can help you explore your options for quitting, improve your motivation and learn new ways to manage stress and cravings.

Nicotine replacements (gum, patches, or lozenges) are also available at no charge to students who participate in ongoing tobacco cessation counseling. If you’d like to find out how we can help you quit, call 509-335-3575.

In the meantime, here are five quick tips to help you get started:

  1. Know why you want to quit. Make sure your motivation is strong enough to outweigh the urge to light up.
  2. Set a quit date. Choosing a specific quit date can help you get serious about your plan to stop using tobacco. Try to find a day when you won’t be too busy or stressed.
  3. Celebrate the small milestones. On top of the health benefits, quitting tobacco can save a lot of money. Reward your achievements and spend the cash you’ve saved on something you enjoy.
  4. Don’t do it alone. Tell the people in your life that you’re planning to quit, join a support group, talk to a counselor, or download an app to receive reminders and support. Counseling and nicotine replacements can significantly improve your chance of success and help ease the symptoms of withdrawal.
  5. Take care of yourself. Caring for your body and mind can help alleviate the stress of quitting tobacco. Exercise will improve your mood and energy. Strive for 7-8 hours of sleep every night, eat a balanced diet and drink plenty of water.
  6. Try and try again. Most people try to quit smoking an average of 8 times before they succeed. Don’t give up! Each time you attempt to quit, you can learn something new about what does and doesn’t work for you, and what you need for success in the future.

Want more? Check out smokefree.gov and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.