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Health & Wellness Services Division of Student Affairs

When to see your doctor

Even if you are doing all that you can to prevent the flu, like getting a vaccine and practicing good health habits, it’s still possible to get sick. If you happen to get the flu despite being vaccinated, a flu shot may help make symptoms milder.

When you’re sick with the flu the best thing to do is stay home and avoid contact with other people. Provide this document to instructors who request a written note for missing class.

Make sure you seek medical care if:

  • Your temperature is greater than 101 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Your symptoms do not improve
  • Your breathing becomes difficult
  • You experience pain in your chest or stomach
  • You become dizzy or lightheaded
  • You are vomiting and can’t keep fluids down

Most healthy people don’t need antiviral medicines for treating influenza. They are different from antibiotics in that they kill viruses, not bacteria. When treatment starts within 2 days of the beginning of your symptoms, antivirals can help make symptoms milder and shorten your illness. If your doctor prescribes antiviral medication, be sure to take them as directed. Also, check out our post on how to manage symptoms at home.

If you are unsure about your symptoms, you can call Health & Wellness Services’ 24-hour nurse line, 509-335-3575 #9 and discuss your symptoms with a nurse.

The best way to lower your chances of contracting the flu is by getting a flu vaccine.

You can get your flu vaccine at Health & Wellness Services, simply head over to the patient portal and book an appointment with your provider.

Health & Wellness Services is giving flu shots every Friday from September 29 – October 27 between 10 am – 3 pm, in the Washington Building, room G41. Bring your insurance card.

It will only take a few minutes to get your vaccine, and you will be on your way!

Campus-wide support for mental health

Campus-wide support for mental health

This week, the Campus Mental Health Collaborative will meet to discuss ongoing suicide prevention and mental health promotion efforts.

The collaborative launched last fall as part of Health & Wellness Services’ involvement in the SAMHSA Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant and the JED Foundation campus program.

Currently, we’re streamlining campus crisis protocols to ensure students in distress get the support they need. Members are also in the process of implementing suggestions from the JED Foundation. For example, Health & Wellness Services and Counseling and Psychological Services are working to better integrate medical systems and expand the number of suicide prevention and mental health training opportunities.

At the upcoming meeting, we plan to review a guide for helping faculty and staff respond to a student in distress. Members will also give updates on their priority projects for mental health and discuss options for expanding access to trainings on other WSU campuses. We’ll continue to look for ways we can support each other’s efforts.

The meeting will take place on October 5, 2017 at 10:00 am in Lighty 405. All are welcome to attend.

To stay updated with mental health promotion and news about the collaborative efforts, make sure you subscribe to our mailing list.

Sale on Nike glasses and sunglasses

Sale on Nike glasses and sunglasses

Join our vision clinic for a special Nike eyewear sale event just for WSU students.

Nike eyewear sale event
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
10:00 am – 3:00 pm
CUB

Get a 25 percent discount on glasses and sunglasses, and enter to win a free pair of frames! We’ll have over 200 styles of Nike eyewear available to try on and purchase.

For any questions about the sale or our vision care services, contact our vision clinic.

Cultural norms about sexual assault

The culture we live in shapes how we view issues like sex- and gender-based violence. Cultural norms can perpetuate myths about what violence is, who perpetrates it, and how we respond.

Rape culture is a term used to describe the various ways sexual violence is normalized, condoned, excused, and encouraged by prevailing social practices, attitudes, and behaviors. Examples include:

  • Seeing gender roles as rigid and unchanging. We often see this play out in popular music and movies. Women are often treated like sexual objects, and men are often portrayed as dominant and aggressive.
  • Refusing to believe victims of sexual violence when they come forward
  • Excusing and minimizing men’s violence toward women – and other men – with words like, “boys will be boys”

Because we’re constantly surrounded by these ideas, they can influence our views in ways we may not even realize. But there are small, manageable things everyone can do to help reduce the effects of rape culture.

Examine the media you consume. This doesn’t mean avoiding movies or TV shows that normalize violence (though that is an option). This simply means you can be more aware of the messages they send and think about how they contribute to a culture that supports violence.

Stay informed. Learn more about cultural norms surrounding rape culture by watching documentaries. Start with Miss Representation, a documentary about how women are represented in media. Another good one is The Mask You Live In, which talks about how boys and men navigate a culture with narrow views on masculinity.

Speak your mind. If someone makes a comment that makes you feel uncomfortable or concerned, you have options for responding to that person.

Support victims and survivors. If someone tells you they were sexually assaulted, believe them and let them know they have options.

Small actions make a difference. Sometimes issues like this seem overwhelming, but remember: No one has to do everything, but everyone can do something.

To learn more, request a presentation for your student group on the topic of rape culture.

Numbers show mental health promotion success

Numbers show mental health promotion success

Recent data shows we’re successfully promoting mental health on our campus.

We strive to share information about suicide prevention and mental health with as many as students as possible, and we want to encourage all Cougs to get help if they need it.

We’ve done a lot in the past three years to meet these goals. For example, we hired a position dedicated to mental and emotional health, expanded the number of training opportunities for responding to students in crisis, and started regularly sharing about mental health here on our blog!

Latest data from our annual National College Health Assessment shows encouraging results for mental health promotion at WSU.

Cougs are getting more information. By 2016, the number of Cougs who said they received information from WSU on suicide prevention increased to 47 percent – a 14.2 percent increase from 2014.

Cougs are more likely to get help. By 2016, 73.3 percent of Cougs reported they would consider seeking help from a mental health professional if they were experiencing a personal problem that was really bothering them. In 2014, only 66.4 percent said they would consider getting help.

Cougs are utilizing campus mental health services more. According to internal data from Counseling and Psychological Services and Behavioral Health, during the past three years the number of students accessing campus mental health services has increased by 19.4 percent.

Moving forward, we will build on our efforts to share about these important topics with students and encourage them to get help when they need it.

This October, the Campus Mental Health Collaborative will reconvene to discuss ways we can continue to support students’ mental and emotional health at WSU.

You can subscribe to receive email updates about mental health and suicide prevention.

Flu facts

Flu Facts

The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated.

Flu vaccines cannot cause influenza. Flu viruses used in vaccines are not live, therefore unable to cause the flu.

Getting a flu shot is the number one way to prevent the flu. If you get the flu vaccine, you are about 60 percent less likely to need treatment for the flu. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that everyone six months of age and older get a flu shot.

A flu shot can help you stay well and prevent serious complications. The flu can cause you to miss school or work. Flu shots helped reduce flu-related hospitalizations by 71 percent during the 2011- 2012 flu season. If you happen to get the flu despite getting a vaccine, a flu shot may help make symptoms milder.

The earlier you get your flu shot, the better. It takes about two weeks to develop antibodies that protect against the flu. Flu season runs from October to May, and getting vaccinated in the fall can help you stay well in the spring.

Get your vaccine at one of our Flu Shot Friday events or by visiting our medical clinic.

7 healthy habits for preventing flu

7 healthy habits for preventing flu

Getting a vaccine is the number one way to prevent the flu, but practicing good health habits can also help stop the spread of flu, colds, and other viruses.

To stay healthy and prevent the flu from spreading, we recommend Cougs practice the following healthy habits:

  1. Keep your hands clean. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use hand sanitizer.
  2. Cover up. Flu viruses can travel up to six feet when someone coughs, talks, or sneezes! Try to sneeze and cough into your sleeve or a tissue.
  3. Stay home if you’re sick. It might not feel important to miss class, work, or other responsibilities, but it’s more important to rest and avoid spreading germs to others. If you do get sick, be sure to check out our managing symptoms at home post.
  4. Kill germs. Flu viruses can live on a surface for up to eight hours! Be sure to disinfect and clean countertops, sinks, doorknobs, and other frequently used surfaces.
  5. Avoid touching your face. Germs spread when you touch a contaminated surface and then touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  6. Don’t share. Don’t borrow items such as lipstick, lip balm, eating utensils, straws, cups, toothbrushes, smoking devices like hookahs, pipes, vape pens, or cigarettes. Flu-contaminated saliva can be transferred by any of these items.
  7. Take care of yourself. Sleeping, exercising, managing stress, and eating healthy foods can all help you stay healthy. Need help with any of these or aren’t sure where to start? Check out our full list of wellness workshops on CougSync.

Managing cold symptoms at home

Managing cold symptoms at home

Do you know what to do when you have a cold? Colds are miserable, but harmless even though it doesn’t seem that way. Knowing what to do when you have a cold can relieve your symptoms and make your illness a little more comfortable.

Symptoms:

  • Sore throat
  • Running or congested nose
  • Cough
  • Blocked or popping ears
  • Muscle aches
  • Slight fever
  • Tiredness
  • Post nasal drip
  • Headaches

Sore throat care:

  • Gargle with warm salt water to help reduce swelling and relieve discomfort (1 tsp (5 g) of salt dissolved in 1 cup of warm water.)
  • Sip warm chicken broth
  • Try warm tea with lemon and honey, apple juice, Jell-O, or popsicles
  • Take frequent small sips if it is painful to swallow
  • Take over-the-counter pain medication like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) which has anti-inflammatory effects and provides pain relief, or acetaminophen (Tylenol) which is a pain reliever only. Make sure you read the label and follow directions on the package.

General things to do to make you feel better:

  • Use a vaporizer or humidifier in your bedroom
  • Prevent dehydration, increase fluid intake
  • Breathe in steam (hot shower)
  • Rest as needed
  • Nasal/Sinus Irrigation (Sinus Rinse®, NetiPot®) relieves sinus and nasal congestion and promotes drainage.
  • Do not smoke or use other tobacco products and avoid secondhand smoke

 Contact us if:

  • Temperature is greater than 101 degrees Fahrenheit. You can purchase a thermometer at our pharmacy or at any drugstore or grocery store.
  • Your symptoms become more severe
  • Your symptoms do not improve
  • You have questions
  • You feel you need to be seen by a medical provider

Many illnesses including “colds” are caused by viruses; antibiotics only affect bacteria, not viruses. To help relieve symptoms, many non-prescription medications are available in our pharmacy.

Read directions on medications to ensure:

  • Correct dosing
  • Awareness of any warnings related to the non-prescription medication
  • Possible interactions with the medications you take on a daily basis
  • Possible interactions with any health conditions you may have.

If you have questions about medications including non-prescription medications, contact our pharmacists at Health & Wellness Services Pharmacy, 509-335-5742.

Get the facts! Violence myths vs. reality

Inaccurate beliefs about sex- and gender-based violence are common. Let’s talk about some of these myths, and more importantly – let’s find out what’s really going on.

Myth: Violence like sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking doesn’t happen that often.

Reality: College students across the country experience violence every day, and many will experience violence before they even get to college.  

Myth: People make bad decisions and put themselves in situations where sexual assault might happen.

Reality: Someone is making a choice to harm another person who is vulnerable (if they’ve been drinking, for example). If you or someone you know experiences sex- and gender-based violence, know it’s not your fault and there are people on this campus and in our community who can help.

Myth: You can’t be victimized by your partner.

Reality: Sexual assault can happen within any relationship, whether people have been together for years or if they’ve just started seeing each other. Sex without consent is sexual assault, even if two people have had consensual sex in the past.

Myth: It’s unlikely that anyone I know would sexually assault someone.

Reality: Anyone, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, age, or other characteristics, can perpetrate violence. Sometimes they’re our friends, our family, or the people we sit next to in class.

Myth: Most people are sexually assaulted by strangers.

Reality: Sexual assault most often occurs between people who know each other. Situations involving strangers committing sexual assault do happen, but they’re rare on college campuses. Most of the time, sexual assault occurs between people who know each other, and in situations where people feel like they are safe (apartments, residence halls, houses, parties, etc.)

Myth: Violence is inevitable, and there’s nothing we can do to prevent it.

Reality: Everyone can do something to prevent violence! For example, you can:

Stay tuned this semester to learn more about how you can make our community safer. You can also subscribe to receive email updates about our collaborative prevention efforts.