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Health & Wellness Services Division of Student Affairs

Get your mental wellness checkup

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Mental health is a key part of your overall health and well-being. You can use a brief online screening to check in on your mental wellness and see if you should connect with a mental health professional.

Get an online mental wellness checkup today!

It’s free and completely confidential. Immediately following the brief questionnaire, you will see your results, recommendations, and information on university and community support resources.

Need help right now? Counseling and Psychological Services is available 24/7 at 509-335-4511.

Sale on TOMS glasses and sunglasses

Three smiling students wearing TOMS glasses and sunglasses

Join our vision clinic for a special sale event just for WSU students!

TOMS eyewear sale event
Wednesday, February 14, 2018
10:00 am – 3:00 pm
CUE Atrium

We’ll have over 200 styles of TOMS glasses and sunglasses available to try on and purchase. Get a 25 percent discount and enter to win a free pair of frames, tote, t-shirt, and more!

For any questions about the sale or our vision care services, contact our vision clinic.

Stressed? We can help!

Stressed? We can help!

Feeling stressed, need help coping, or just want tips for managing your stress? We can help!

Join our text messaging program and we will:

  • Send you weekly tips for lowering stress
  • Check in to see how you’re doing
  • Share information about resources around campus

To sign up, text “STRESS” to 30644. You can join at any point in the semester!

Online mental health screening coming soon

Coming soon, Health & Wellness Services will have an online mental health screening available to WSU students.

Brief screenings are the quickest way to determine if you should connect with a mental health professional – it’s like a checkup from the neck up.

Mental health concerns are common. For example, a 2016 survey of WSU students found that within the past 12 months, 56.1 percent of Cougs reported feeling overwhelming anxiety at some point and 34.8 percent of Cougs felt so depressed that it was difficult to function (ACHA-NCHA, 2016).

While many students experience a mental health concern, they may be unsure if they need help or where to go for support. By making the mental health screening available, we hope to encourage Cougs to get help if they need it.

The program is free of charge, accessible online, and completely anonymous. At the end of the screening, students will get their results, recommendations, and information on local support resources.

By offering the screening, we’ll make progress towards fulfilling our SAMSHA Grant and JED Foundation goals of informing Cougs about mental health support services and decreasing stigma around mental health.

To promote the program, we collaborated with a team of students in the Murrow College of Communication. We’ll be using their research and suggestions as we implement this screening.

We purchased our screening program from Screening for Mental Health, Inc. If you would like to learn more about the mental health screening and stay up to date on mental health promotion and suicide prevention, you can subscribe to receive email updates.

Protect yourself from flu

student using hand sanitizer

We’re in the middle of a very active flu season and we’re starting to see cases of influenza at our medical clinic. Here’s how you can protect yourself from the flu and get the care you need!

Know the symptoms

Make sure you know the symptoms of flu and cold, and when to see a health care provider. Remember that flu viruses cannot be treated with antibiotics.

If you feel sick, stay home

You might not want to miss class, work, or other responsibilities, but the most important thing you can do is rest and avoid spreading germs to others.

According to the university policy on absences, instructors cannot require written excuses from health care professionals. If your instructor asks for a note, you can provide the HWS letter on excused student absences.

Get medical care

You can make an appointment at our medical clinic online or over the phone. Keep in mind that our same-day appointments are limited due to short-staffing. If you need or want to seek care from a community provider, we can help you with referrals and questions.

You can also call our main line at 509-335-3575 for 24/7 advice from nursing staff. When the clinic is closed, your call will be directed to a nurse at Harborview Medical Center.

If you have mild cold or flu symptoms, check out our guide on managing symptoms at home.

Protect yourself from flu

Try to avoid spreading germs and practice healthy habits for preventing flu. If you haven’t gotten your flu shot yet, there’s still time! The peak of flu season can run through March, and flu activity can continue until May.

Flu shots are covered in full by most insurances. Check with your insurance provider for details on your coverage and where to go. You can check with our clinic on our flu shot supplies and make an appointment by calling 509-335-3575.

Get your guide for helping students in distress

Faculty and staff are often able to recognize when a student is struggling, but it can be hard to know what to say or do.

To ensure students get the support they need, Student Affairs created a comprehensive guide that faculty and staff can reference when they’re concerned about a student.

The guide covers how to recognize common signs of distress, helpful ways to respond to a student, campus and community support resources, and reporting options.

Each WSU location has a guide with specific campus and community resources. If you want to print or save a PDF guide, click on your WSU location below:

These PDFs are not accessible to screen readers. If you need a screen reader accessible version, please email hws.programs@wsu.edu.

Soon, information from the guide will be available on our website.

9 ways you can promote mental health

9 ways you can promote mental health

According to our National College Health Assessment for 2016, Cougs report that stress, sleep difficulties and anxiety are the top three health factors affecting their academic performance within the last 12 months.

By encouraging Cougs’ mental and emotional well-being, faculty and staff can support their academic success. To get started, check out this list of ideas and resources you can use in the year ahead.

  1. Be familiar with campus resources. Learn more about mental health resources and include a list in your syllabus or student employee training materials.
  2. Get connected. Subscribe to receive email updates about mental health promotion and suicide prevention efforts at WSU.
  3. Take a training. Attend Campus Connect suicide prevention training or schedule a training for your department.
  4. Encourage stress management. Let students know about our stress management text messaging service. Add a Power Point slide to a presentation or advertise on your office’s digital reader board.
  5. Talk about it! Integrate a mental health topic into a classroom discussion or project.
  6. Support students in distress. Know how to use the AWARE Network to share your concerns about a student’s well-being, behavior, or academic performance. This system will connect the student with University staff that can help.
  7. Get your staff involved. Add a mental health component to a staff training or brainstorm ways your department can promote mental health.
  8. Advertise mental health resources. Print suicide prevention resources fliers or request brochures to display in your office.
  9. Join the Campus Mental Health Collaborative. This group works together to implement a comprehensive public health framework to promote mental health and prevent suicide of WSU students. Email programs@wsu.edu to get involved.

Is there another way you’re promoting mental health at WSU? Let us know by sending an email to hws.programs@wsu.edu

1,797 Cougs get their flu shot!

A record breaking 1,797 Cougs got their flu vaccine at our flu shot events this fall!

A flu shot is the number one way to prevent the flu. If you haven’t already gotten your vaccine, now is a great time to get it. Students can visit our medical clinic to get their shot.

When more Cougs get vaccinated, less flu can spread in our community. Don’t forget there are other healthy habits that can help protect you from the flu virus.

We hope you have a happy, healthy, and flu-free winter!

Toolkit for supporting students in distress

Toolkit for supporting students in distress

Student Affairs is currently developing a toolkit that faculty and staff can use to help students who are in distress. The goal of the toolkit is to ensure students have a successful academic career by getting them connected to campus resources that will support their specific needs.

Faculty and staff play a key role in the lives of students. They work closely with them and are often able to notice when a student is having a hard time.

With the help of the toolkit, faculty and staff will be able to recognize potential signs of distress, respond in the moment, and connect the student to appropriate campus resources.

The guide will cover a wide range of concerns. For example, if a student experiences the loss of a family member, financial issues, violence, or a mental health concern, the guide will offer steps for helping the student and connecting them to specific campus resources.

To develop this guide, we reviewed similar toolkits from other universities and sought feedback from WSU faculty, advisors, deans, administrators, and staff. Our team decided to adapt a guide created by UMatter at UMass and tailor it to the specific needs of our community.

The toolkit will be available this fall in an online format. If you want to know when it’s live, you can subscribe to receive email updates about suicide prevention and mental health promotion.

Accomplishments during grant’s first year

Accomplishments during grant’s first year

We recently met with members of the Campus Mental Health Collaborative to discuss ongoing suicide prevention and mental health promotion efforts.

During our meeting, we talked about goals for the SAMSHA Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant and what we’ve done so far.

SAMSHA grant goals

Promote mental health through campus-wide partnerships. Together, collaborative members are actively looking for ways to support each other’s mental health promotion efforts. For example, during our meeting, departments brainstormed the idea of adding a mental health component to their staff and student trainings.

Offer suicide prevention training. Last year we began offering suicide prevention training, Campus Connect. Over 430 Cougs have taken this training and we expanded it to an online format.

In addition to education on best practices for responding to someone in crisis, Campus Connect teaches essential communication and relationship building skills. Departments like Athletics and Residence Life find this training so valuable, they require their employees to take it.

Collect and evaluate data to refine our mental health promotion activities. We want all Cougs to get more information about suicide prevention and to get help if they experience a mental health concern. To measure our progress towards these goals, we use data from the National College Health Assessment and quarterly grant reports. This data will also help us understand how we can support students’ changing mental health needs.

Expand and improve programs for students. This past spring, we launched a stress management texting program which sends students tips for managing their stress – over 680 Cougs have signed up! Currently, we’re expanding this program for student-athletes, and we hope to offer it to more groups on campus.

Moving forward, we plan to adapt content from a research-based stress management workshop. We also are looking for faculty collaborators to evaluate the texting program.

Inform Cougs about support services and decrease stigma around mental health. We’re working with a team of students in the Murrow College of Communication on a campaign to promote a mental health screening tool and educate students about resources and suicide risk factors.

For the remainder of our meeting, collaborative members gave updates on their current mental health promotion activities and we brainstormed ways to use existing resources to expand our efforts. The meeting concluded with feedback on a guide for responding to students in crisis, which is currently in development.

We look forward to building relationships with collaborative members and supporting each other’s work. If you would like to learn more about the collaborative and stay up-to-date on mental health promotion and suicide prevention, you can subscribe to receive email updates.